Valle Del Sur

Pacific Calm, 24x12, oil on canvas
Pacific Calm, 24×12, oil on canvas

I was invited by a long time painting friend, Steve Wise, to do a demo at the Valle Del Sur Art Guild in Morgan Hill, a town about 10 miles south of San Jose. I have painted this area many times including during the Creeks and Rivers of Silicon Valley.

Steve asked me to do either a seascape or lake scene, so I chose a seascape. Recently, I have been doing a series of vertical water paintings, so picked a seascape to start for the scene. As usual with these demos, there is not enough time to do a finished painting, but I tried to finish off certain portions to demonstrate various techniques in painting seascapes.

It was a small, but lively group, and seemed like questions were coming once a minute as I tried to paint. Steve is quite the art historian, and kept things lively with his historical quips.

The painting is the tenth ‘vertical water’ painting series and from the same general area as the fourth in the series found here. The narrow inlet is along the California Coast in Garrapata State Park just south of Carmel, and close to Big Sur.

I forgot about taking pictures until almost the end of the demo, so here are a few–

Getting into the painting
Getting into the painting
Getting intense
Getting intense
The painting as far as I got during the demo.
The painting as far as I got during the demo.

Thanks, Trudie, for some of the photos!

I later spent a few hours in the home studio finishing the piece.

A Lower Tuolumne

The Tuolumne, 24x12, oil on canvas
The Tuolumne, 24×12, oil on canvas

 
I am revisiting the Tuolumne River in the eighth of my ‘Vertical Water’ series. I previously painted it in the second work of this series you can read about here.

This scene, is just a few hundred yards from the other painting, but even later in the year, and right by the Hwy 120 bridge in Tuolumne Meadows. One of the largest high-elevation meadows in the Sierra Nevada, dome studded Tuolumne Meadows is a sub-alpine section of the Tuolumne River in the high country of Yosemite National Park. It is a mecca for outdoorsmen, fishermen, campers, hikers, rock climbers, and people who just want to enjoy the outdoors. It is also a center for those who want to horseback or backpack the high Sierra Nevada Mountain range, often called “The Range of Light”

 


Here are a few pictures of the painting developing. Click on a thumbnail to see the full picture…


 
 
Well, how about some selfies in the studio!

Comin’ At Ya!

The waves come crashing in, pounding the narrow walls, rushing in and out creating thunderous sound. With sea spray in your face, there is nothing like standing on a bluff over the thrashing waves…especially in Big Sur, California!


Coming' at Ya, 24x12, oil on gallery wrap canvas
Coming’ at Ya, 24×12, oil on gallery wrap canvas


   
Nothing like momentum! First it was Kako-no-ike in Japan, then twice in the high Sierra Nevada Mountains with the Mighty Tuolumne. and Tenaya Lake; and now the California coast. This is the fourth ‘vertical water’ painting recently done, and now becoming a series. This narrow inlet is along the California Coast in Garrapata State Park. Just south of Carmel, and close to Big Sur, it is my favorite place to paint along the coast. I usually do one or two paintings there for the Carmel Art Festival each year.

I painted this more alla prima (all at once), which didn’t take as long as the last two water paintings. Those last two, I let dry several times so I could glaze over the water. Below are a few snapshots of the progression. Click on each photo to see a larger version. Email subscribers may have to click on the above title to see them.



 
and here is the actual scene…
Garrapata Inlet
Garrapata Inlet


   
I ran out of this size vertical canvas(12×24), so just bought three more. I still have a number of ideas for more vertical water paintings…stay tuned!

Don Edwards National Wildlife Refuge Exhibit

During my quest of painting the creeks of Silicon Valley, stuff I painted in many places, medicine but almost all the creeks end up in the marshes of the San Francisco Bay in what is now called the Don Edwards National Wildlife Refuge. The Refuge encompasses most of the southern portions of the bay, generic and is a wonderful reclamation of land once used for industrial purposes.

I wrote a number of times about the area in FortySix: Don’s Sunrise Pix, FortySeven: Hunter’s Heaven, and Fifty: Ghost City

We put up 18 paintings specifically from the Coyote Creek Watershed in their Education Center today. The paintings will be on display now until the fall. A special event is scheduled for September 5, which is free, but you must sign up here.

More info can be found here.

Los Gatos Plein Air 2015

I have been participating in the Los Gatos Plein Air almost every year since it’s inception. Since it is close to my house, I can stay home and paint the local area without worrying about all the travel expense and time.

During plein air competitions, artists have several days to paint and present for sale finished and framed paintings. The festival coordinators stamp the back of the canvas to ensure all work is done in the days allotted. We had our panels stamped on Tuesday morning, and had until Friday afternoon to produce the paintings.

I already posted some of these on Facebook, but for those who are not on social media, here are a few pictures from the show. Click on a thumbnail to view a larger picture Note: Email subscribers may not see all pictures. Just click on the title for a link to the online version.

Tuesday
After getting my canvas stamped, I headed out to Guadalupe Creek to paint a California Sycamore as I had been doing a series of these—

Wednesday
The next morning, it was out to Metcalf Road about 10 miles from my house. I drove around a bit and settled on this scene—

After lunch, I drove over to McKean road, south of San Jose, and after a little exploring decided to do a vista of Almaden Valley. I almost had to talk myself in tackling this painting as there is quite a bit to paint in a short time for a competition.

I only got about half way through the painting, so called it a day and would return tomorrow afternoon to finish it.

Thursday,
I was up early for the drive over to Almaden Reservoir. I had checked it on Tuesday, and even in this drought, it was close to full.

The Los Gatos Rotary Association was putting on a lunch for the artists, so I drove into Los Gatos, and had a pleasant meal with some of the other artists. I then headed to Los Gatos Creek. I knew in the hot midday it would be shady and cool…just right for a creek painting!

It was then back to McKean and Country View Dr to finish the Almaden Valley vista painting.

Friday,
I spent in touchup and framing. That evening was a ticketed reception, and I sold the California Sycamore painting.

Saturday
The next day was the main sale day to the public. I sold all but one of the five painted for the show.

My panel at the show.
My panel at the show.

Below are the five paintings I did for the show–

2015 Carmel Art Festival

Once again I participated in the Carmel Art Festival and this was my tenth year to be in the show. During the competition, medical artists have two days to paint and present at least two finished and framed paintings for auction. The festival coordinators stamp the back of the canvas to ensure all work is done in the two days allotted.

I already posted these on Facebook, but for those who are not on social media, here are a few pictures from the show. Click on a thumbnail to view a larger picture–

I ended up doing three paintings–

Thanks for stopping in! In a few weeks it will be the Los Gatos Art Festival!