Squaw Creek

Since April 2020 I have posted on Facebook a painting each day as a brief diversion from the lockdowns and other bad news this year. Neglecting my weblog, I’ll post in the coming days some of my better posts.

“Squaw Creek”, 16×12, oil on board

June 6,2020  · Much of the US is pretty hot right now, so how about something to cool off? Today’s painting from the “Studio Pen” is of Squaw Creek right after a major snowstorm. This scene is towards the entrance to Squaw Valley, CA, now called Olympic Valley, and where the 1960 Winter Olympics were held.

BBBRRRRR!!

Takiyama Jiinn Sekihi

Since April 2020 I have posted on Facebook a painting each day as a brief diversion from the lockdowns and other bad news this year. Neglecting my weblog, I’ll post in the coming days some of my better posts.

“Takiyama Jiinn Sekihi”, 16×20, oil on canvas

I can usually predict about how many ‘likes’ I get on each painting I post. The more majestic, beautiful, familiar a scene is usually gets the most. I did this painting several years ago as part of my ongoing Japan series just because I thought it was an interesting thing to paint, and wonder what it means.

This is near a waterfall temple up a remote canyon near Maniwa-shi Japan that my son discovered while living in the area. I did a plein air of the temple on a cold drizzly day, but this stone marker and it’s setting made an interesting composition. To me it’s a mysterious story…how long has it been there? I can’t read Japanese, so what does it say? What is the purpose of the stone with it’s barely discernible carving?

Today’s offering from the “Studio Roundhouse” probably won’t get many ‘likes’, but I still like it.

“Takiyama Jiinn Sekihi”, 16×20, oil on canvas. Japanese for “mountain waterfall temple stone monument.”

China Cove Panorama

Since April 2020 I have posted on Facebook a painting each day as a brief diversion from the lockdowns and other bad news this year. Neglecting my weblog, I’ll post in the coming days some of my better posts.

“China Cove Panorama”, 12×36, oil on canvas

“The greatest meeting of land and water in the world.”
–landscape artist Francis McComas.

Not too far from my new home in Marina, is Point Lobos, the crown jewel of California’s coastal state parks. The views are endless and I could spend a lifetime painting just there. Today’s offering from the “Studio Impoundment” is a view of China Cove, which according to legend inspired Robert Lewis Stephenson to write the book Treasure Island. 

El Dorado

Since April 2020 I have posted on Facebook a painting each day as a brief diversion from the lockdowns and other bad news this year. Neglecting my weblog, I’ll post in the coming days some of my better posts.

“El Dorado”, 40×30, Acrylic on Canvas

“El Dorado”, 40×30, acrylic on canvas, always reminds me of the gentle roar of a high Sierra river as it plunges over rapids, cataracts, and falls. If you can find a campsite nearby, listening to the gentle white noise of the river is a wonderful way to lull you asleep at night.

Today’s offering from the “Studio Hold”, is another older acrylic, completed in the early 2000’s. This painting depicts the Clarke Fork of the of the Middle Fork of the Stanislaus River in the high Sierra mountains of California. It can be found on the Clark Fork Road just off Hwy 108 near Sonora Pass.

Asilomar Splash

“Asilomar Splash”, 8×16, oil on panel, plein air

The sea was wonderful.

The air was wonderful.

The sounds of crashing waves and seagulls drifting in the air was wonderful. The wonderful sky gradually went from morning overcast to nice and sunny.

The sun was wonderful.

Half the reason I paint is to just go out, sit, and ponder wonderful nature for a time. And I always bring back a remembrance of that moment.

Monterey Bay Plein Air Painters Association is a local group who, among other activities, holds a group paintout once a week, usually on Wednesdays. An art buddy, Al Shamble, picks the locations, and conducts the events. They met on Thursday this week at Asilomar State Beach in Pacific Grove, so I went and spent time with them.

Unusually, only about 5 or 6 of us showed up. I sat in my camping chair and for a couple wondrous hours did a little painting. Here’s a few pictures of the day.

Tee Time

Since April 2020 I have posted on Facebook a painting each day as a brief diversion from the lockdowns and other bad news this year. Neglecting my weblog, I’ll post in the coming days some of my better posts.

“Tee Time”, 15×30, oil on canvas

Today’s offering from the “Studio Up the River”, is for all the golfers. Some years ago I participated in a plein air festival at La Rinconada Golf Course in Los Gatos, CA. I did three paintings, two of which sold, but still have this one of the first fairway looking east towards the rising sun…just about time to tee off.