China Cove Panorama

Since April 2020 I have posted on Facebook a painting each day as a brief diversion from the lockdowns and other bad news this year. Neglecting my weblog, I’ll post in the coming days some of my better posts.

“China Cove Panorama”, 12×36, oil on canvas

“The greatest meeting of land and water in the world.”
–landscape artist Francis McComas.

Not too far from my new home in Marina, is Point Lobos, the crown jewel of California’s coastal state parks. The views are endless and I could spend a lifetime painting just there. Today’s offering from the “Studio Impoundment” is a view of China Cove, which according to legend inspired Robert Lewis Stephenson to write the book Treasure Island. 

Asilomar Splash

“Asilomar Splash”, 8×16, oil on panel, plein air

The sea was wonderful.

The air was wonderful.

The sounds of crashing waves and seagulls drifting in the air was wonderful. The wonderful sky gradually went from morning overcast to nice and sunny.

The sun was wonderful.

Half the reason I paint is to just go out, sit, and ponder wonderful nature for a time. And I always bring back a remembrance of that moment.

Monterey Bay Plein Air Painters Association is a local group who, among other activities, holds a group paintout once a week, usually on Wednesdays. An art buddy, Al Shamble, picks the locations, and conducts the events. They met on Thursday this week at Asilomar State Beach in Pacific Grove, so I went and spent time with them.

Unusually, only about 5 or 6 of us showed up. I sat in my camping chair and for a couple wondrous hours did a little painting. Here’s a few pictures of the day.

Garappata Vista

Since April 2020 I have posted on Facebook a painting each day as a brief diversion from the lockdowns and other bad news this year. Neglecting my weblog, I’ll post in the coming days some of my better posts.

“Garappata Vista”, 30×40, oil on canvas

During this lockdown, I have ridden my Harley down the Big Sur Coastline a couple times for a break to get out of the house. Today’s offering from the “Studio Clink” is a view I drive by along this spectacular coastline in Garappata State Park. 

Fort Ord Dunes

“Fort Ord Dunes”, 12×24, oil on canvas

With sweeping views of Monterey Bay and 4 miles of beaches, Fort Ord Dunes is one of the newer California state parks.   The afternoon sun turns the foaming waves a bright silvery color, and illuminates the red, orange, yellow and green ice plant fields along the dunes. 

We have been walking the trails along this beautiful Marina coastline near our new home in Marina, CA recently and I just had to put it to canvas. 

Comin’ at Ya

Since April 2020 I have posted on Facebook a painting each day as a brief diversion from the lockdowns and other bad news this year. Neglecting my weblog, I’ll post in the coming days some of my better posts.

Coming’ at Ya, 24×12, oil on canvas

The waves come crashing in, pounding the narrow walls, rushing in and out creating thunderous sound. With sea spray in your face, there is nothing like standing on a bluff over the thrashing waves…especially in Big Sur, California!

Today’s offering from the studio hoosegow is another vertical water painting. This piece is a cove in Garrapata State Park, now not too far from our new home we just moved to. Be sure to click on the picture to see the entire painting.

You can read more about the location and also pictures of the development of this piece here…

Wild Hokkaido

Shimadomarigyo Harbor
Shimadomarigyo Harbor. 8×10, acrylic on canvas

Hokkaido is the northernmost, second largest, and least developed of Japan’s four main islands. The winters are harsh with lots of snowfall, below zero temperatures and frozen seas, while in summer it does not get as hot and humid as in the other parts of Japan.  With unspoiled nature, Hokkaido attracts many outdoor lovers, including skiers and snowboarders in the colder seasons. Hikers, cyclists, and campers come during summer and fall.  It is considered to have some of the best snow powder in the world.

I just returned from a couple weeks in Japan visiting my son, who recently moved to Sapporo, the capital and largest city in Hokkaido.  After 5 years living in SW rural Japan, he wanted a change of scenery so moved to northern Japan and one of the snowiest metropolis’s in the world. Sapporo hosted the first ever Olympics in Asia, the 1972 Winter games.  

Sapporo
Sapporo


I won’t turn this weblog entry into a travelogue (More photos can be found on my Facebook Page,) but I did have a chance to do some painting.  We spent a lot of time doing the normal tourist things, and it was a little rainy and cloudy off and on our entire visit.  I normally paint in oils while at home, but as usual, I brought my acrylic travel kit which is much easier to handle on international trips.  BTW, in case you missed it, some time ago, Plein Air Magazine published an article about my traveling with acrylic paints, you can see here.

Soon after we arrived, we realized it would be raining in a few days, so we took advantage of the sunshine, rented a car, and drove around the Hokkaido countryside for a couple days.  Our first daytrip was south of Sapporo where we enjoyed rural Hokkaido and visited a couple lakes.  The lakes in this area are all caldera lakes, that is, they are ancient volcanos. 

The first was Lake Shikotsu-ku  We spent some time at the visitors center (we were in a national park), and I did a quick 90 minute study, plus a drone flight.  The lake is very reminiscent of Lake Tahoe, except without all the boulders along the shore.  

We then went on to Lake Toya, which was just as pretty, but it was getting late in the day, so flew the drone, and then headed home.


The next day, Justin and I headed to the Shakotan coastal area.  What a spectacular coastline!   It is much like the coastal areas of California, but with little Japanese fishing villages scattered throughout.  We drove to the fishing village of Shakotan, had lunch, and then backtracked to a place I had spotted on our drive there to paint. 

Shimadomarigyo Harbor is a small fishing harbor along the coast with a view of Candle Rock, an unusual natural monolith.  It was a beautiful view, but the winds were around 20mph with gusts up to 40.  Even my tubes of paint were being blown away.  I moved to a boat shed to get out of the wind, but it was still too much to handle, so I made a quick study to finish the painting later.

The final painting is at the top of this weblog entry.  Here are a few shots of the area…

I was disappointed the strong winds prevented me from flying my drone and capturing this amazing place from above, so this area is definitely on my list for the next visit!


There doesn’t seem to be as many temples and shrines in Hokkaido as in other parts of Japan.  My assumption is this is because Hokkaido was the last area where the Japanese people populated.  Prior to that, the Ainu indigenous people inhabited the area. 

However, there was a little Buddhist shrine a few blocks from Justin’s apartment, called Nantoku Shrine, so I spent a few hours painting it.

The shrine in the painting looks a little askew, so will correct that when I have time.


One of the largest parks in Sapporo, Nakajima Park, is within walking distance of Justin’s apartment, and it was still Sakura (cherry blossom time), so I painted there twice.

The next day was still nice, so I went back to the same place and did another painting facing a different way.

 


Overall it was a wonderful journey and we saw new parts of Japan.  I was a little disappointed I wasn’t able to fly my drone more, but when we were at places where it is allowed, the weather didn’t cooperate. 

More photos can be found on my Facebook Page, and I’ll be making a short video in the next week or two, so stay tuned.

Up next week is the Carmel Art Festival, so stay double tuned!!

 

Devil’s Slide

We have had a pretty wet last couple of weeks, but during a break between storms, I headed out to Half Moon Bay to meet with an old college days friend for lunch.  Of course, I have to make it a day with some painting and droning along the way!

After waiting for rush hour traffic to die down, took off for the hours drive to Half Moon Bay.  By the time I arrived, it was only about an hour before lunch, so explored a bit, took pictures, and a couple drone flights.

After a long lunch, I headed up the coast to an area called Devil’s Slide.  Recently, Caltrans built a tunnel bypassing the slide area, but the last turnout allows walking access to the old road, so decided to do a painting right there.  By that time I only had a couple hours to paint before the parking lot closed.

I didn’t really get a finished painting as I was enjoying the scenery as much as working.  I am still trying to decide if I should finish the painting in the studio, or start a new one sometime in the future.

Below are a few pictures of the day.  Click on the thumbnail for a larger view.

 

There was no droning allowed right there, so I drove back down the coast and took some arial shots.  Enjoy this short video above the beautiful California Coast entitled “Coastal Soothe“…

 

If you saw my last post, FOAM, most of that was videoed during the visit.

Thanks for stopping by, and stay tuned for more developments!

Foam

I was painting along the California coast yesterday, and of course, flying my drone.  I stayed until sunset and captured some amazing aerial shots around Half Moon Bay, and north towards Pacifica at the Devils Slide area and the new tunnels.  It inspired me to throw together this more artsy video which includes shots from yesterday, and others from the past year.  I think it is my favorite drone video so far…

 

I recorded other amazing video while painting, so stay tuned for more spectacular viewing, and maybe a painting!

A Year’s Drone Journey

WOW! What a year has it been!

I purchased a DJI Mavic Pro drone about a year ago and having a blast ever since!  The Mavic is a ‘prosumer’ level drone, that is, marketed to consumers but has many professional level features.

I originally hadn’t considered doing much painting from it, but can’t resist doing some.  First, enjoy the very best video segments of a year droning all over the beautiful California coast, painting with art groups, the high Sierras, deep blue Lake Tahoe, spectacular Big Sur, quaint Carmel, Horse Shoe Bend AZ, Springdale (Zion), and maybe a few biker shots!

Some of my first flights was to do “The World’s First Plein Air Drone Selfie” you can read about here.

First Drone Selfie, 12x16, oil on board

Later on, I couldn’t resist doing another painting which I took from a video frame captured above Davenport, CA.  titled “176′ Above Davenport” you can read about here.

176' Above Davenport, 24x36, oil on canvas
176′ Above Davenport, 24×36, oil on canvas

I am planning on doing more drone based paintings in 2019, so stay tuned!

Have a Happy and Prosperous New Year!

 

176′ Above Davenport

176' Above Davenport, 24x36, oil on canvas
176′ Above Davenport, 24×36, oil on canvas


As the summer morning fog clears along the California coast, many times the crashing waves, spray, wind, and lingering fog create an ethereal atmosphere of a misty soft landscape, or should I say seascape. I live within an hours drive of the coast, and visit often to paint, camp, and ride my Harley.

I was recently painting with the California Art Club along the coast near Davenport CA and produced a short video, you can see here–

and also a weblog entry you can see here.

Many of you know I purchased a drone earlier this year. I bought it mainly for fun and to give a different perspective to my painting, motorcycle, and other adventures. Although my main intent was not to do paintings from a drone’s perspective, I did do a plein air drone selfie you can read about here.

Reviewing the drone footage around Davenport, however, I couldn’t resist painting a scene far above the coast. The video frame I painted from is at about 0:47 on the above video. I wanted to create an atmosphere of morning mist still lingering around the coast and the sun starting to highlight parts of the coastal bluffs. I did sharpen and saturate the colors a bit from the video, and highlighted parts of the cliff more. Here is the frame I extracted and enhanced in Photoshop as my study:

Above Davenport study photo
Above Davenport study photo

As you can see, I painted it pretty much ‘as-is’. In the distance is the coastal hamlet of Davenport, about ten miles north of Santa Cruz. The drone was 176 feet above the bluff, so probably 250 feet above the ocean.

Perhaps I’ll look at my drone videos again, and maybe produce a drone painting series?!? Stay tuned!