WINDY, FROTHY, BLUSTERY, SUNNY, and GLORIOUS!!

I haven’t seen Garrapata coastline this frothy in a long time. I went out with the Monterey Bay Plein Air Painters Wednesday to the coastline. It was such a beautiful day with the unusual pounding surf. Only a few artists showed up this time, and some quit because of the wind.

Generally the paintings I do on these paintout events are just for fun, and not to keep. However this one I might keep and touch up in the studio. About two hours of work.

Enjoy this short video of the pounding surf by Soberanes Point along the beautiful California coastline.

Hear Me Roar!

From April 2020, for a year, I posted on Facebook a painting each day as a brief diversion from the lockdowns and other bad news this year. Neglecting my weblog, I’ll post in the coming days some of my better posts. Some of these paintings are still available.

“Hear Me Roar”, 24×12, oil on canvas 

Winter storms bring a lot of water action to the California Coastline. The huge swells created many miles out to sea come crashing against the shoreline rocks creating a constant roar, crashing waves, frothy surf, and great painting subjects.

From the “nouvelle prison de studio” is one of the ‘Vertical Water” series I add to from time to time. This scene is from Pacific Grove looking due west out to sea as a storm on the horizon is breaking.

Endicott Arm

From April 2020, for a year, I posted on Facebook a painting each day as a brief diversion from the lockdowns and other bad news this year. Neglecting my weblog, I’ll post in the coming days some of my better posts. Some of these paintings are still available.

“Endicott Arm”, 24×12, oil on canvas

The towering cliffs surrounded us effused with waterfalls tumbling down to the glacial carved inlet. Advances and declines of the massive Ice Age glaciers had scoured this area dozens of times. Waterfalls plunged from astonishing heights down steep fjord walls and into the azure water. The fresh air, enhanced by the fizzing and popping of the glacial ice in the salty sea as it slowly melts, was all around. Harbor seals eyed us as our cruise ship made it’s way up Endicott Arm.

We visited Endicott Arm on our 4th cruise to Alaska in 2017, hopping the boat in San Francisco for a 10 day round trip.

Today’s offering from the “Coraintín Stiúideo” is one of my “Vertical Water” series of the azure sea in Endicott Arm. 

Pigeon Point Lighthouse

From April 2020, for a year, I posted on Facebook a painting each day as a brief diversion from the lockdowns and other bad news this year. Neglecting my weblog, I’ll post in the coming days some of my better posts. Some of these paintings are still available.

“Pigeon Point Lighthouse”, 24×12, oil on canvas

One of the prominent man made features on the San Mateo Coast of California, along the Pacific Ocean, is the Pigeon Point Lighthouse. Built in 1871, it is the tallest lighthouse on the western coast of the United States. It is still used for Coast Guard navigation, and a small overnight hostel is now housed in the old light keeper’s housing.

From the “Studio Bilangguan” is another ‘Vertical Water’ painting I did a couple years ago of the historic structure. You can read more about it here, and enjoy a short drone video of the area —
http://www.donaldneff.com/blog/pigeon-is-the-point/

Primary Swell

A new painting from the Neff Studio.

“Primary Swell, Marina”, 22×28, oil on canvas

We can normally hear the surf faintly in the distance two miles inland at our home inn Marina, CA, especially at night. But this was different. It sounded like distant crackling thunder as if a huge squall was hovering over Monterey Bay. The sound seemed to reverberate through the neighborhood.

Last January, Monterey Bay was experiencing unusually high surf and tides due to confluence of the moon, storms, etc. Some call it a primary swell. I went out early morning and did a little droning and video, eventually producing a short video, shown below.

This new painting is a drones eye view of the Monterey Bay coastline in Marina, CA. I extracted a still shot from the video I took that morning as my study for this piece. I was taken with this view as it shows the back of the wave and not your normal seascape. The sun is just starting to peek over the dunes and cliffs of Marina Dunes Beach illuminating the crest of the waves.

In case you missed it, here is the original video I produced back in January .

Marina Dunes Pathway

“Marina Dunes Pathway”, 16×20, oil on panel

Huge sand dunes line the southeastern side of Monterey Bay, some, I am guessing, over 60 feet high.   Created by the constant ocean and winds, the dunes form a barrier between the bay and inland areas such as the towns of Marina and Seaside, plus the fertile Salinas Valley.  The dunes are a patchwork of sand, ice-plant, grasses, and other vegetation.  Wildlife is also found here with shorebirds, raccoons, coyotes, squirrels, and a unique legless lizard.

At one time, when this was part of Fort Ord, the dunes were populated with rifle ranges, munition depots, and other military installations.  There was even an immense officers club and recreational facility overlooking the bay, which eventually fell into disrepair as the coast eroded beneath.

We frequently take walks along the coastal dunes of Monterey Bay near our new home in Marina.  This painting is a pathway to Marina Dunes Beach and Preserve.  What drew me to this scene is the late afternoon sun filtering through the trees and lighting up the colorful ice-plant.  The ocean was not visible from this viewpoint but I wanted to orient the viewer to where you are. So, I did use a little artists license, and removed some of the dunes so you could see the bay and surf.  I did this piece several months ago, but was not entirely satisfied, so dabbled on it a bit off and on.   I might dabble a bit more, but call it finished…for now.

Big Sur Cove

Since April 2020 I have posted on Facebook a painting each day as a brief diversion from the lockdowns and other bad news this year. Neglecting my weblog, I’ll post in the coming days some of my better posts.

“Big Sur Cove”, 24×18, oil on canvas

June 29,2020  Saturday I posted a short video of a motorcycle ride along the Big Sur coast. I have taken several rides along this spectacular coast during the virus craziness just to get out of the house. Haven’t heard of anyone catching anything just breezing along on a motorcycle! We always drive by this Rocky Creek Bridge scene, today’s offering from the “Studio Clink”.

China Cove Panorama

Since April 2020 I have posted on Facebook a painting each day as a brief diversion from the lockdowns and other bad news this year. Neglecting my weblog, I’ll post in the coming days some of my better posts.

“China Cove Panorama”, 12×36, oil on canvas

“The greatest meeting of land and water in the world.”
–landscape artist Francis McComas.

Not too far from my new home in Marina, is Point Lobos, the crown jewel of California’s coastal state parks. The views are endless and I could spend a lifetime painting just there. Today’s offering from the “Studio Impoundment” is a view of China Cove, which according to legend inspired Robert Lewis Stephenson to write the book Treasure Island. 

Asilomar Splash

“Asilomar Splash”, 8×16, oil on panel, plein air

The sea was wonderful.

The air was wonderful.

The sounds of crashing waves and seagulls drifting in the air was wonderful. The wonderful sky gradually went from morning overcast to nice and sunny.

The sun was wonderful.

Half the reason I paint is to just go out, sit, and ponder wonderful nature for a time. And I always bring back a remembrance of that moment.

Monterey Bay Plein Air Painters Association is a local group who, among other activities, holds a group paintout once a week, usually on Wednesdays. An art buddy, Al Shamble, picks the locations, and conducts the events. They met on Thursday this week at Asilomar State Beach in Pacific Grove, so I went and spent time with them.

Unusually, only about 5 or 6 of us showed up. I sat in my camping chair and for a couple wondrous hours did a little painting. Here’s a few pictures of the day.

Garappata Vista

Since April 2020 I have posted on Facebook a painting each day as a brief diversion from the lockdowns and other bad news this year. Neglecting my weblog, I’ll post in the coming days some of my better posts.

“Garappata Vista”, 30×40, oil on canvas

During this lockdown, I have ridden my Harley down the Big Sur Coastline a couple times for a break to get out of the house. Today’s offering from the “Studio Clink” is a view I drive by along this spectacular coastline in Garappata State Park.